The Open Group released ArchiMate 2.1

Actually ArchiMate 2.1 is a specification maintenance release incorporating comments, corrections and clarification issues which were raised since version 2.0.
For further details with respect to the changes refer to this official blog post by The Open Group. In addition a detailed listing of the changes is available as a dedicated document.
Only hours after the release, vendors of flexible EAM tools announced support to version 2.1… ;-)

The Open Group Introduced New Standards Supporting Risk Management

At the latest The Open Group conference in London the Security Forum introduced version 2.0 of the Risk Taxonomy (O-RT) technical standard and released the new technical standard Risk Analysis (O-RA). The new version of the Risk Taxonomy standard incorporates some minor updates based on the feedback by practitioners that have been using it. As a companion to it, the Risk Analysis standard provides a process framework that supports FAIR-based risk analysis.
For further details refer to the official blog posts by The Open Group that summarize both standards quite good (part I, partII).
I’ve added both standards to the knowledge base section IT Strategy and Governance.

Upcoming Tweet Jam on the Convergence of Emerging Technologies hosted by The Open Group

At first Gartner picked up the thought and named it ‘The Nexus of Forces’. IDC coined the term ‘third platform’ and The Open Group established a new forum named ‘Platform 3.0′. All of them recognized that there are several (emerging) technologies that are likely to converge in the future and potentially change the way businesses and people engage with each other. The lists and names of the technologies in scope differ depending on the organizations named before. In general they refer to the following technologies: social media, cloud computing, mobile computing, Internet of things and processing of big data.

From the perspective of the discipline of enterprise architecture management this convergence raises the question if (major) architectural changes are required to cope with this development.

To encourage knowledge exchange on this question, The Open Group will host a tweet jam on Thursday, June 6 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT (see this blog post).

Please find below an initial set of links suggested for further reading.

Gartner

IDC

The Open Group

The Open Group Released a Business Reference Model for the Natural Resources Industry

The Exploration, Mining, Metals and Minerals (EMMM) Forum of The Open Group developed a business reference model that has been approved as an Open Group Technical Standard (see The Open Group Blog post here). The reference model focuses on the natural resources industry, i.e. the high-level business processes of different mining organisations dealing with all metals and minerals. It consists of a documentation describing the concepts and definitions of the reference model and a model poster providing an abstract one-page-view of the model. These deliverables are available for download from The Open Group Bookstore (see here).

The Role of the Enterprise Architect as a Sherpa

When thinking of the role of an enterprise architect, I came up with the idea of comparing the enterprise architect with the role of a sherpa. In government, a sherpa is a person who represents a head of state or government and prepares international summits, especially the G8 summit. Sherpas meet before the official summits to analyse and prepare the decisions or agreements. This reduces the effort required at the official meetings considerably.

In addition, the sherpas are generally responsible for elaborating on concepts and explaining them to the corresponding head of state or government. That means that they are responsible for the briefing of, and knowledge transfer to, the head of state or government so that this person is prepared for an official meeting.

The term sherpa refers to the Nepalese ethnic group, the Sherpa people, who guide and support expeditions in the Himalayas. In government, the term refers to the fact that sherpas pave the way for the official meetings and agreements. You could also think of the sherpas as bearing the brunt of work in preparation of the summits. The sherpas are assumed to be quite influential but in general they do not have the authority to make final decisions or agreements.

The role of the enterprise architect is very similar to the role of a sherpa in government. Enterprise architects work towards official meetings where architectural decisions are taken. This might be a meeting of the architecture board or any other governance body in charge of architectural decisions. In preparation of these meetings they elaborate on architectural options and any deliverables and artifacts that are required to evaluate these options. All architectural options should be analysed and evaluated upfront to the official meeting so that these meetings can be conducted efficiently. In opposition to the government domain, the architectural options should be evaluated objectively, based on clearly defined metrics/KPIs, i.e. architectural decisions shouldn’t be taken for purely political reasons (cp. ‘No Politics, Just Great Architecture‘).

Analogous to the role of the sherpa, the enterprise architect is responsible for the briefing and knowledge transfer to the stakeholder so that this person is able to make decisions within the official meeting. Depending on the stakeholder’s character and knowledge on architectural topics, this could require much effort and sometimes constrains the options you are able to discuss within the official meeting. In this spirit the enterprise architect paves the way for the official meetings and decisions. He/She bears the brunt of work in preparation of these meetings.

In summary, the role of the enterprise architect and sherpa are very similar. They take a back seat and focus on methodology, concepts, options, knowledge and facts. Both strive for an efficient and effective decision process and are intensively concerned with the exchange of knowledge prior to an official decision meeting. Therefore, they are quite influential but do not make decisions on their own. Nevertheless, enterprise architects should be objective in any case whereas sherpas often act with a hidden political agenda that is driven by individual or personal interest.

The Open Group’s Conference in Newport Beach, CA – Watch out for the Proceedings

The Open Group’s conference in Newport Beach draws to a close. Watch out for the proceedings and check what conference documents/slides they’ll make available… ;-)

Mastering ArchiMate Edition I by Gerben Wierda

During The Open Group conference in Barcelona Gerben Wierda released his book Mastering ArchiMate Edition I. It contains an introduction to the ArchiMate language and documents his practical experience using the language within the financial domain. The book is available freely under a ‘begware’ license and I suggest that you donate or buy a licence if you use it commercially.